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Microscope imaging software with optional microscopy analysis software

The MetaMorph® Microscopy Automation and Image Analysis Software automates acquisition, device control, and image analysis. It easily integrates dissimilar fluorescent microscope hardware and peripherals into a single custom workstation. The software offers many user-friendly application modules for biology-specific analysis. Two complementary packages, MetaFluor® software for fluorescence ratio imaging, and MetaVue® software for basic image acquisition and processing, are included in the portfolio.

  • Scalable Icon

    Support third-party microscopes

    MetaMorph software works with many commercially available microscopes, laser launches, TIRF optics, and can be enabled on previously-installed imaging systems compatible with MetaMorph software.

  • Measure Icon

    Measure fluorescence ratio imaging

    MetaFluor® Fluorescence Ratio Imaging Software is designed for single or multi-wavelength intracellular ion measurements to provide greater insight to ion exchange and intracellular function.

  • Analysis Icon

    Document and analyze images

    MetaVue™ Research Imaging System is a simple, easy-to-use software application for acquiring and processing images, performing graphics functions, and archiving and retrieving images.

Resolving molecular organization and dynamics using localization-based super-resolution microscopy

Resolving Molecular Organization and Dynamics Using Localization-Based Super-Resolution Microscopy

Features

  • Image Icon

    Real-time image processing

    Image process is supported by a graphics processing unit hardware acceleration. It resolves sub-cellular objects as small as 20 nm spatially and 40 nm axially.

  • Breadth Icon

    Multi-dimensional acquisition module

    Allows for the capture of complex acquisition sequences using a flexible, guided user interface.

  • Analysis Icon

    Integrated morphometric analysis

    Measures and categorizes objects into discreet user-definable classes based on any combination of morphometric parameters, such as shape, size, or optical density.

  • Software Icon

    Scan slide module

    Automates the acquisition of multiple images and then stitches them seamlessly together. Ideal for large tissue samples, this ensures reproducibility while taking the guesswork out of tiling experiments.

  • Connectivity Icon

    Device and camera streaming

    Accelerates image capture rate and simultaneously transfers images to memory during acquisition, capturing dynamic cellular events for applications such as live cell/kinetic imaging.

  • Measure Icon

    4D viewer with 3D measurements

    Tools for multidimensional visualization including stacks of sequential images, multiple Z-sections, wavelengths, time points, and positions. Data can be rendered for 3D isosurface viewing and rotation.

Resources of MetaMorph Microscopy Automation and Image Analysis Software

Presentations
Videos & Webinars
Antigen / Immunogen Discovery and Optimization

Immunology and Vaccine Development Workflow

Hybridoma Workflow

Hybridoma Workflow

Resolving molecular organization and dynamics using localization-based super-resolution microscopy

Resolving Molecular Organization and Dynamics Using Localization-Based Super-Resolution Microscopy

Real-time single-molecule based super-resolution microscopy reconstruction: theoretical and practical insight

Real-Time Single-Molecule Based Super-Resolution Microscopy Reconstruction: Theoretical and Practical Insight

  • Citation
    Dated: Aug 20, 2011
    Publication Name: Journal of Nanoparticle Research

    Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles protect cells from oxidant-mediated apoptosis

    Catalytic nanoparticles represent a potential clinical approach to replace or correct aberrant enzymatic activities in patients. Several diseases, including many blinding eye diseases, are promoted by excessive oxidant stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles represent two potentially therapeutic… View more

    Catalytic nanoparticles represent a potential clinical approach to replace or correct aberrant enzymatic activities in patients. Several diseases, including many blinding eye diseases, are promoted by excessive oxidant stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles represent two potentially therapeutic nanoparticles that de-toxify ROS. In the present study, we directly compare these two classes of catalytic nanoparticles. Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles were found to be 16 ± 2.4 and 1.9 ± 0.2 nm in diameter, respectively. Using surface plasmon-enhanced microscopy, we find that these nanoparticles associate with cells. Furthermore, cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles demonstrated superoxide dismutase catalytic activity, but did not promote hemolytic or cytolytic pathways in living cells. Importantly, both cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles reduce oxidant-mediated apoptosis in target cells as judged by the activation of caspase 3. The ability to diminish apoptosis may contribute to maintaining healthy tissues.

    Contributors: Andrea Clark, Aiping Zhu, Kai Sun & Howard R. Petty  
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  • Citation
    Dated: Aug 30, 2007
    Publication Name: Journal of Neuroscience Methods

    High throughput quantification of cells with complex morphology in mixed cultures

    Automated image-based and biochemical assays have greatly increased throughput for quantifying cell numbers in in vitro studies. However, it has been more difficult to automate the counting of specific cell types with complex morphologies in mixed cell cultures. We have developed a fully automated, fast, accurate and objective method for the… View more

    Automated image-based and biochemical assays have greatly increased throughput for quantifying cell numbers in in vitro studies. However, it has been more difficult to automate the counting of specific cell types with complex morphologies in mixed cell cultures. We have developed a fully automated, fast, accurate and objective method for the quantification of primary human GFAP-positive astrocytes and CD45-positive microglia from images of mixed cell populations. This method, called the complex cell count (CCC) assay, utilizes a combination of image processing and analysis operations from MetaMorph™ (Version 6.2.6, Molecular Devices). The CCC assay consists of four main aspects: image processing with a unique combination of morphology filters; digital thresholding; integrated morphometry analysis; and a configuration of object standards. The time needed to analyze each image is 1.82 s. Significant correlations have been consistently achieved between the data obtained from CCC analysis and manual cell counts. This assay can quickly and accurately quantify the number of human astrocytes and microglia in mixed cell culture and can be applied to quantifying a range of other cells/objects with complex morphology in neuroscience research.

    Contributors: Pritika J.Narayan, Hannah M.Gibbons, Edward W.Mee, Richard L.Faull, Michae Dragunow  
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  • Citation
    Dated: Mar 21, 2007
    Publication Name: Journal of Neuroscience

    Functional Neural Development from Human Embryonic Stem Cells: Accelerated Synaptic Activity via Astrocyte Coculture

    How a naive human neuroepithelial cell becomes an electrophysiologically active neuron remains unknown. Here, we describe the early physiological development of neurons differentiating from naive human embryonic stem (hES) cells. We found that differentiating neuronal cells progressively decrease their resting membrane potential, gain… View more

    How a naive human neuroepithelial cell becomes an electrophysiologically active neuron remains unknown. Here, we describe the early physiological development of neurons differentiating from naive human embryonic stem (hES) cells. We found that differentiating neuronal cells progressively decrease their resting membrane potential, gain characteristic Na+ and K+ currents, and fire mature action potentials by 7 weeks of differentiation.

    Contributors: M. Austin Johnson, Jason P. Weick, Robert A. Pearce and Su-Chun Zhang  
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